classic poetry for children kids poems Edward Lear poems for kids children's poetry
friendship poetry for children kids poems funny poetry for children kids poems J Patrick Lewis Lewis Carrol poetry for kids limericks poetry for children kids poems nonsense poetry for children kids poems
nursery rhymes for children random poetry for children kids poems sad poems for children Scottish poetry for children kids poems Shel Silverstein poems for children
short poems for children kids poetry spike milligan poems for children stuart macfarlane Scottish poems T S Eliot Poems for children Tongue Twisters for kids valentine love poems for children kids poetry

Home

A. A. Milne Poems

Animal Poems

Birthday Poems

Christmas Poems

Classical Poems

Edward Lear Poems

Friendship Poems

Funny Poems

Lewis Carroll Poems

Limericks

Love Poems

Nonsense Poems

Nursery Rhymes

Random Poems

Random Poems - 1

Random Poems - 2

Random Poems - 3

Random Poems - 4

Random Poems - 5

Random Poems - 6

Random Poems - 7

Random Poems - 8

Random Poems - 9

Random Poems - 10

Random Poems - 11

Random Poems - 12

Random Poems - 13

Sad Poems

Scottish Poems

Short Poems

Spike Milligan Poems

Stuart Macfarlane Poems

Tongue Twisters - 1

Tongue Twisters - 2

Tongue Twisters - 3

Tongue Twisters - 4

Tongue Twisters - 5

T. S. Eliot

Valentine Poems

Limerick Contest

 

 

Aesopís Fables

Amusement

Christmas Jokes

College Humor

Complete Nonsense

Fairy Tales

Famous Poems

Famous Quotes

Free View Webcams

Friendship Quotes

Funny Cat Pictures

Funny Cats

Funny Jokes

Funny Jokes Online

Funny Pictures

Funny Poems

Funny Quotes

Ghosts

Ghost Pictures

Ghost Stories

Glaswegian

Humorous Scripts

Inspirational Poems

Jokes

Knock Knock Jokes

Limerick Poems

Limericks

Love Poems

Fantasy Books

Mockery

Not Mensa

Photographs

Poet

Poker Articles

Posters

Quotations Online

Riddles

Riddles Online

Duck Webcam

Strange Laws

Stupid Laws

Tongue Twisters

Weird Facts

Weird Websites

Weird

Worst City

Worst Jokes

random poetry for children kids poems

Can't make up you mind whether you want a funny or sad - long or short - pink or violet poem? Here are a few from our vast poetry collection.



Collection : Poems for Children - 1966

 

Epitaph by Edward Lear

From The Complete Nonsense Book,
edited by Lady Strachey, 1912.

Beneath these high Cathedral stairs
Lie the remains of Susan Pares.
Her name was Wiggs, it was not Pares,
But Pares was put to rhyme with stairs.





= = = = = = = = = =



The Voice of the Lobster by Lewis Carroll

Tis the voice of the Lobster: I heard him declare
'You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair.'
As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose
Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes.
When the sands are all dry, he is gay as a lark,
And will talk in contemptuous tones of the Shark:
But, when the tide rises and sharks are around,
His voice has a timid and tremulous sound.'

'I passed by his garden, and marked, with one eye,
How the Owl and the Panter were sharing a pie:
The Panther took pie-crust, and gravy, and meat,
While the Old had the dish as its share of the treat.
When the pie was all finished, the Owl, as a boon,
Was kindly permitted to pocket the spoon:
While the Panther received knife and fork with a growl,
And concluded the banquet by eating the owl.


= = = = = = = = = =



The Cat and the Moon by William Butler Yeats

The cat went here and there
and the moon spun round like a top,
and the nearest kin of the moon,
the creeping cat, looked up.
Black Minnaloushe stared at the moon,
for, wander and wail as he would,
the pure cold light in the sky
troubled his animal blood.

Minnaloushe runs in the grass
lifting his delicate feet.
Do you dance, Minnaloushe, do you dance?
When two close kindred meet,
what better than call a dance?
Maybe the moon may learn,
tired of that courtly fashion,
a new dance turn.

Minnaloushe creeps through the grass
from moonlit place to place,
the sacred moon overhead
has taken a new phase.
Does Minnaloushe know that his pupils
will pass from change to change,
and that from round to crescent,
from crescent to round they range?

Minnaloushe creeps through the grass
alone, important and wise,
and lifts to the changing moon
his changing eyes.


= = = = = = = = = =



The Pobble Who Has No Toes by Edward Lear

The Pobble who has no toes
Had once as many as we;
When they said 'Some day you may lose them all;'
He replied 'Fish, fiddle-de-dee!'
And his Aunt Jobiska made him drink
Lavender water tinged with pink,
For she said 'The World in general knows
There's nothing so good for a Pobble's toes!'

The Pobble who has no toes
Swam across the Bristol Channel;
But before he set out he wrapped his nose
In a piece of scarlet flannel.
For his Aunt Jobiska said 'No harm
Can come to his toes if his nose is warm;
And it's perfectly known that a Pobble's toes
Are safe, -- provided he minds his nose!'

The Pobble swam fast and well,
And when boats or ships came near him,
He tinkledy-blinkledy-winkled a bell,
So that all the world could hear him.
And all the Sailors and Admirals cried,
When they saw him nearing the further side -
'He has gone to fish for his Aunt Jobiska's
Runcible Cat with crimson whiskers!'

But before he touched the shore,
The shore of the Bristol Channel,
A sea-green porpoise carried away
His wrapper of scarlet flannel.
And when he came to observe his feet,
Formerly garnished with toes so neat,
His face at once became forlorn,
On perceiving that all his toes were gone!

And nobody ever knew,
From that dark day to the present,
Whoso had taken the Pobble's toes,
In a manner so far from pleasant.
Whether the shrimps, or crawfish grey,
Or crafty Mermaids stole them away -
Nobody knew: and nobody knows
How the Pobble was robbed of his twice five toes!

The Pobble who has no toes
Was placed in a friendly Bark,
And they rowed him back, and carried him up
To his Aunt Jobiska's Park.
And she made him a feast at his earnest wish
Of eggs and buttercups fried with fish, -
And she said 'It's a fact the whole world knows,
That Pobbles are happier without their toes!'





= = = = = = = = = =



Address to the Toothache by Robert Burns

My curse upon your venom'd stang,
That shoots my tortur'd gums alang,
An' thro' my lug gies mony a twang,
Wi' gnawing vengeance,
Tearing my nerves wi' bitter pang,
Like racking engines!

When fevers burn, or argues freezes,
Rheumatics gnaw, or colics squeezes,
Our neibor's sympathy can ease us,
Wi' pitying moan;
But thee-thou hell o' a' diseases-
Aye mocks our groan.

Adown my beard the slavers trickle
I throw the wee stools o'er the mickle,
While round the fire the giglets keckle,
To see me loup,
While, raving mad, I wish a heckle
Were in their doup!

In a' the numerous human dools,
Ill hairsts, daft bargains, cutty stools,
Or worthy frien's rak'd i' the mools, -
Sad sight to see!
The tricks o' knaves, or fash o'fools,
Thou bear'st the gree!

Where'er that place be priests ca' hell,
Where a' the tones o' misery yell,
An' ranked plagues their numbers tell,
In dreadfu' raw,
Thou, Toothache, surely bear'st the bell,
Amang them a'!

O thou grim, mischief-making chiel,
That gars the notes o' discord squeel,
Till daft mankind aft dance a reel
In gore, a shoe-thick,
Gie a' the faes o' Scotland's weal
A townmond's toothache!




<-- Previous     |     Next -->

 

 

If you liked these poems take a look at our other great kids poems:

 

POEMS FOR CHILDREN

 
 

Most of the poems on Poems for Children are by Stuart Macfarlane and covered by copyright. Please do not use these without permission. Poems not written by Stuart Macfarlane are assumed to be in the public domain. If you spot any that you thing should not be here please let us know and it will be removed.

 

Copyright 2010 PoemsForChildren.org