classic poetry for children kids poems Edward Lear poems for kids children's poetry
friendship poetry for children kids poems funny poetry for children kids poems J Patrick Lewis Lewis Carrol poetry for kids limericks poetry for children kids poems nonsense poetry for children kids poems
nursery rhymes for children random poetry for children kids poems sad poems for children Scottish poetry for children kids poems Shel Silverstein poems for children
short poems for children kids poetry spike milligan poems for children stuart macfarlane Scottish poems T S Eliot Poems for children Tongue Twisters for kids valentine love poems for children kids poetry

Home

A. A. Milne Poems

Animal Poems

Birthday Poems

Christmas Poems

Classical Poems

Edward Lear Poems

Friendship Poems

Funny Poems

Lewis Carroll Poems

Limericks

Love Poems

Nonsense Poems

Nursery Rhymes

Random Poems

Random Poems - 1

Random Poems - 2

Random Poems - 3

Random Poems - 4

Random Poems - 5

Random Poems - 6

Random Poems - 7

Random Poems - 8

Random Poems - 9

Random Poems - 10

Random Poems - 11

Random Poems - 12

Random Poems - 13

Sad Poems

Scottish Poems

Short Poems

Spike Milligan Poems

Stuart Macfarlane Poems

Tongue Twisters - 1

Tongue Twisters - 2

Tongue Twisters - 3

Tongue Twisters - 4

Tongue Twisters - 5

T. S. Eliot

Valentine Poems

Limerick Contest

 

 

Aesop’s Fables

Amusement

Christmas Jokes

College Humor

Complete Nonsense

Fairy Tales

Famous Poems

Famous Quotes

Free View Webcams

Friendship Quotes

Funny Cat Pictures

Funny Cats

Funny Jokes

Funny Jokes Online

Funny Pictures

Funny Poems

Funny Quotes

Ghosts

Ghost Pictures

Ghost Stories

Glaswegian

Humorous Scripts

Inspirational Poems

Jokes

Knock Knock Jokes

Limerick Poems

Limericks

Love Poems

Fantasy Books

Mockery

Not Mensa

Photographs

Poet

Poker Articles

Posters

Quotations Online

Riddles

Riddles Online

Duck Webcam

Strange Laws

Stupid Laws

Tongue Twisters

Weird Facts

Weird Websites

Weird

Worst City

Worst Jokes

random poetry for children kids poems

Can't make up you mind whether you want a funny or sad - long or short - pink or violet poem? Here are a few from our vast poetry collection.



Collection : Poems for Children - 612

 

The three little kittens, they lost their mittens by Anonymous

The three little kittens, they lost their mittens,
And they began to cry,
'Oh, mother dear, we sadly fear,
That we have lost our mittens.'
'What! Lost your mittens, you naughty kittens!
Then you shall have no pie.'
'Meow, meow, meow.'
'Then you shall have no pie.'


The three little kittens, they found their mittens,
And they began to cry,
'Oh, mother dear, see here, see here,
For we have found our mittens.'
'Put on your mittens, you silly kittens,
And you shall have some pie.'
'Purr, purr, purr,
Oh, let us have some pie.'


The three little kittens put on their mittens,
And soon ate up the pie,
'Oh, mother dear, we greatly fear,
That we have soiled our mittens.'
'What, soiled your mittens, you naughty kittens!'
Then they began to sigh,
'Meow, meow, meow,'
Then they began to sigh.


The three little kittens, they washed their mittens,
And hung them out to dry,
'Oh, mother dear, do you not hear,
That we have washed our mittens?'
'What, washed your mittens, then you're good kittens,
But I smell a rat close by.'
'Meow, meow, meow,
We smell a rat close by.'


= = = = = = = = = =



There was an Old Person of Nice by Edward Lear

There was an old person of Nice,
Whose associates were usually Geese.
They walked out together, in all sorts of weather.
That affable person of Nice!


= = = = = = = = = =



Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man by Anonymous

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man,
Bake me a cake, as fast as you can;
Pat it, prick it, and mark it with B,
Put it in the oven for baby and me.


= = = = = = = = = =



Teddy Bear by A. A. Milne

A bear, however hard he tries,
Grows tubby without exercise.
Our Teddy Bear is short and fat,
Which is not to be wondered at;
He gets what exercise he can
By falling off the ottoman,
But generally seems to lack
The energy to clamber back.

Now tubbiness is just the thing
Which gets a fellow wondering;
And Teddy worried lots about
The fact that he was rather stout.
He thought: 'If only I were thin!
But how does anyone begin?'
He thought: 'It really isn't fair
To grudge one exercise and air.'

For many weeks he pressed in vain
His nose against the window-pane,
And envied those who walked about
Reducing their unwanted stout.
None of the people he could see
'Is quite' (he said) 'as fat as me!'
Then, with a still more moving sigh,
'I mean' (he said) 'as fat as I!

Now Teddy, as was only right,
Slept in the ottoman at night,
And with him crowded in as well
More animals than I can tell;
Not only these, but books and things,
Such as a kind relation brings -
Old tales of 'Once upon a time,'
And history retold in rhyme.

One night it happened that he took
A peep at an old picture-book,
Wherein he came across by chance
The picture of a King of France
(A stoutish man) and, down below,
These words: 'King Louis So and So,
Nicknamed 'The Handsome!'' There he sat,
And (think of it!) the man was fat!

Our bear rejoiced like anything
To read about this famous King,
Nicknamed 'The Handsome.' There he sat,
And certainly the man was fat.
Nicknamed 'The Handsome.' Not a doubt
The man was definitely stout.
Why then, a bear (for all his tub )
Might yet be named 'The Handsome Cub!'

'Might yet be named.' Or did he mean
That years ago he 'might have been'?
For now he felt a slight misgiving:
'Is Louis So and So still living?
Fashions in beauty have a way
Of altering from day to day.
Is 'Handsome Louis' with us yet?
Unfortunately I forget.'

Next morning (nose to window-pane)
The doubt occurred to him again.
One question hammered in his head:
'Is he alive or is he dead?'
Thus, nose to pane, he pondered; but
The lattice window, loosely shut,
Swung open. With one startled 'Oh!'
Our Teddy disappeared below.

There happened to be passing by
A plump man with a twinkling eye,
Who, seeing Teddy in the street,
Raised him politely to his feet,
And murmured kindly in his ear
Soft words of comfort and of cheer:
'Well, well!' 'Allow me!' 'Not at all.'
'Tut-tut! A very nasty fall.'

Our Teddy answered not a word;
It's doubtful if he even heard.
Our bear could only look and look:
The stout man in the picture-book!
That 'handsome' King - could this be he,
This man of adiposity?
'Impossible,' he thought. 'But still,
No harm in asking. Yes I will!'

'Are you,' he said,'by any chance
His Majesty the King of France?'
The other answered, 'I am that,'
Bowed stiffly, and removed his hat;
Then said, 'Excuse me,' with an air,
'But is it Mr Edward Bear?'
And Teddy, bending very low,
Replied politely, 'Even so!'

They stood beneath the window there,
The King and Mr Edward Bear,
And, handsome, if a trifle fat,
Talked carelessly of this and that….
Then said His Majesty, 'Well, well,
I must get on,' and rang the bell.
'Your bear, I think,' he smiled. 'Good-day!'
And turned, and went upon his way.

A bear, however hard he tries,
Grows tubby without exercise.
Our Teddy Bear is short and fat,
Which is not to be wondered at.
But do you think it worries him
To know that he is far from slim?
No, just the other way about -
He's proud of being short and stout.


= = = = = = = = = =



About the Bloath by Shel Silverstein

In the undergrowth
There dwells the Bloath
Who feeds upon poets and tea.
Luckily I know this about him,
While he knows almost nothing of me.



<-- Previous     |     Next -->

 

 

If you liked these poems take a look at our other great kids poems:

 

POEMS FOR CHILDREN

 
 

Most of the poems on Poems for Children are by Stuart Macfarlane and covered by copyright. Please do not use these without permission. Poems not written by Stuart Macfarlane are assumed to be in the public domain. If you spot any that you thing should not be here please let us know and it will be removed.

 

Copyright 2010 PoemsForChildren.org